http://www.cherokeephoenix.orgRachel Ottley, Greenhouse Pediatric Therapy occupational therapist, stands in the sensory gym at Greenhouse in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. The room is one of four used to help stimulate children with developmental disorders such as autism and teach them how to socially interact and communicate. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Rachel Ottley, Greenhouse Pediatric Therapy occupational therapist, stands in the sensory gym at Greenhouse in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. The room is one of four used to help stimulate children with developmental disorders such as autism and teach them how to socially interact and communicate. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Therapy improves autism effects in children

Rice falls through a sensory tool at Greenhouse Pediatric Therapy in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. Sensory tools and techniques are used at Greenhouse to help improve communication and interaction among children with developmental disorders. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee Nation citizen Nathan Hicks holds his son, Braden, while his daughter, Lilly, sits between him and his wife, Elizabeth. Lilly was diagnosed with autism when she was 18 months old. However, thanks to therapy, she attends a regular third grade class and is not in any therapy. COURTESY
Rice falls through a sensory tool at Greenhouse Pediatric Therapy in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. Sensory tools and techniques are used at Greenhouse to help improve communication and interaction among children with developmental disorders. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
02/05/2018 12:00 PM
BROKEN ARROW – Autism is a neural developmental disorder identified by social skills, repetitive behaviors, speech and nonverbal communication challenges. In the United States one child in 68 is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. In Oklahoma that rate increases to one in 52 children.

Symptoms are more noticeable in children as young as 18 months. “You can see it through sensory issues and social communication issues and some motor stuff as well, how kids use their bodies,” Rachel Ottley, Greenhouse Pediatric Therapy occupational therapist, said.

Prime ages for diagnoses are between 2 and 3 years old. Signs include difficulty sleeping, picky eating, being held and the types of food eaten. Babies with autism display no social interaction such as smiling at someone and can get extremely focused on an object or attached to things like a blanket, toy or cup.

Cherokee Nation citizen Nathan Hicks said his daughter, Lilly, was diagnosed with autism at nearly 2 years. He said when she was 1 she didn’t meet certain milestones, and symptoms became more noticeable. At 18 months, Nathan and his wife told their pediatrician that Lilly was different. A psychiatrist confirmed Lilly’s diagnosis after several visits.

Nathan said one indicator was she wasn’t communicating the way an 18-month-old should. Rather she stared at the ground or floor making repetitive noises. “One of the markers that she wasn’t doing was she wouldn’t cross midline. By that, if something was sitting off to the right, she would use her right hand but she wouldn’t reach over with her left hand to get it. It was very divisional. Right hand got the right side things, left hand got the left side things.”

He said Lilly was attached to one pair of shoes and black stretchy pants. Noises also affected her. A vacuum cleaner whirring or static-type noises soothed her, while ambulance or fire truck sirens upset her.

Ottley said other indicators include when the touch sensory system is affected, meaning a child may not like to be hugged, held, bathed or have his/her skin rubbed, while others love to be held tight and bounced around.

Nathan said he and wife also worked through digestive issues with Lilly after noticing she had a hard time digesting food containing gluten and casein proteins.

“A lot of autistic people, they have digestive issues. There’s a nerve that runs from your stomach to the brain that reacts differently in a lot of people with autism, and they’re sensitive to a lot of different kinds of food. Gluten intolerance is pretty common and the casein is like a man-made glue that they put in a lot of milk products to keep them together,” he said.

He said once Lilly’s diet became gluten- and casein-free, she became less irritable.

Lilly is diagnosed on the spectrum as high functioning. Meaning though she has autistic symptoms, she still functions well in every day life.

“The spectrum means that some people appear more severely impacted than others. But it’s a little bit of a misnomer really because you can be quite severely affected by autism but still have a job and a marriage and a relationship and kids and all those things and still be really quite autistic,” Ottley said.

There is no known cause for autism. Ottley said it is a mystery, though there is a genetic component. Most likely the genetic contributions of the mother and father could present autism in the child. Boys are four times more likely to be diagnosed, meaning girls present differently and are often diagnosed later. Ottley said race or ethnicity is not a factor as it’s “all across the board,” and there are under-diagnosed children in minority groups.

Nathan said after Lilly’s diagnosis, she began occupational and speech therapy. The therapists she saw used the DIRFloortime model, which stands for Development, Individual Differences and Relationships. It’s designed to create interaction between the child and those around them.

“You get down on their level, literally on the floor. You see whatever sparks their interest. You make that your world. You see what you can make up that interesting about it to get them to go back and forth with you,” Nathan said. “A lot of it was just kind of some tough love, too.”

For example, if Lilly sat on a swing, Nathan would hold it until she said go. It taught her to say words to communicate. Other techniques like board games or throwing a piece of paper back and forth were used to stimulate interaction.

Ottley, who worked with Lilly, said as a therapist she looks at the child’s daily life from playing, sleeping, eating and getting dressed to determine how to make those tasks easier. “If we could make stuff like that easier, then the family gets to love each other more and be with each more instead of just managing behavior and trying to figure how to keep this kid calm.”

Using the DIRFloortime model takes into account the individual differences in children in terms of speech, language, their sensory system and what they enjoy most. Ottley said they build a child’s development around those things.

Lilly endured occupational therapy until first grade and speech therapy until second grade. Now, at age 9, she attends a regular third grade class and is not in any therapy. Nathan said he is thankful for the therapists who helped his daughter.

“You look at life a little differently when you’re living through it,” he said.
About the Author
Lindsey Bark grew up and resides in the Tagg Flats community in Delaware County. She graduated from Northeastern State University in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in mass communication, emphasizing in journalism. She started working for the Cherokee Phoenix in 2016.
 
Working for the Cherokee Phoenix, Lindsey hopes to gain as much knowledge as she can about Cherokee culture and people. She is a full-blood Cherokee and a citizen of the United Keetoowah Band.
 
Her favorite activities are playing stickball and pitching horseshoes. She is a member of the Nighthawks Stickball team in Tahlequah and enjoys performing stickball demonstrations in various communities. She is also a member of the Oklahoma Horseshoe Pitchers Association and competes in sanctioned tournaments throughout the state.
 
Previously a member of the Native American Journalists Association, she has won three NAJA awards and hopes to continue as a member with the Cherokee Phoenix.
lindsey-bark@cherokee.org • 918-772-4223
Lindsey Bark grew up and resides in the Tagg Flats community in Delaware County. She graduated from Northeastern State University in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in mass communication, emphasizing in journalism. She started working for the Cherokee Phoenix in 2016. Working for the Cherokee Phoenix, Lindsey hopes to gain as much knowledge as she can about Cherokee culture and people. She is a full-blood Cherokee and a citizen of the United Keetoowah Band. Her favorite activities are playing stickball and pitching horseshoes. She is a member of the Nighthawks Stickball team in Tahlequah and enjoys performing stickball demonstrations in various communities. She is also a member of the Oklahoma Horseshoe Pitchers Association and competes in sanctioned tournaments throughout the state. Previously a member of the Native American Journalists Association, she has won three NAJA awards and hopes to continue as a member with the Cherokee Phoenix.

Health

BY STAFF REPORTS
05/22/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Sequoyah High School is once again participating in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Summer Food Program. It will run May 29 through June 28, Monday through Thursday, at the SHS cafeteria. The program provides nutritious meals at no charge to children during summer vacation. Children aged 18 and under regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability are eligible to receive meals. Breakfast will be served from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. and lunch will be from noon to 1 p.m. Adults may eat breakfast for $2.25 and lunch for $4. The cafeteria is at 17091 S. Muskogee Ave. For more information, call 918-453-5190.
BY STAFF REPORTS
04/27/2018 04:00 PM
TULSA – Cherokee Nation clinical dietitian Tonya Swim was awarded “Outstanding Dietitian of the Year for Outstanding Career of Contributions to the Dietetics Profession” on April 19 at the Oklahoma Academy of Nutrition and Dietetic Convention. Swim, who works at the A-Mo Health Center in Salina, is involved with the OkAND organization as public relations and communication chairwoman and has helped increase its social media presence by promoting registered dietitians as nutrition experts and renewing a partnership with Oklahoma City Fox News by coordinating weekly cooking segments. She also served as chairwoman for the 2018 OkAND convention and chaired the event in 2016. As chairwoman, she worked to provide Oklahoma’s registered dietitians and dietetic technicians with opportunities for continuing education. “It was an honor and I am humbled to have received this award. I give most of the credit to the amazing group of dietitians in our state for helping my ideas become reality and to the wonderful company I work for in allowing me to grow as a dietician. I am so blessed with a supportive family who push me to be the best I can. Thank you to everyone,” Swim said.
BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Reporter – @cp_bbennett
04/25/2018 09:30 AM
SALLISAW – When Cherokee Nation citizen Shacotah Sanders lost his hair after undergoing chemotherapy for Stage 2 Hodgkin lymphoma last year, his mother, Tammie Simms, shaved her head in solidarity. “Chemotherapy is a really long process. It’s painful. It’s stressful. It’s really emotional because I lost all my hair,” Sanders said. “That was something I was really scared of right there, but the main thing that keeps me going is my mom. She’s like the only one that really keeps me going.” This familial support is once more a shoulder for Sanders to lie on because while his hair has grown back, so too have the cancerous spots in his neck. It is a possibility that he had accepted after going into remission in October. “I had prepared myself for it because there’s always that possibility that it could come back,” Sanders said. “Every three months I have a checkup, a PET scan, and we decided to do one in early March this year. We did it, waited about two weeks to get the results. We went back to my oncologist doctor, and he said that it came back, but it wasn’t as big as last time and not as bad. He said it was in the same spot and at the same stage, Stage 2.” Sanders began undergoing 22 rounds of radiation on April 3 to again battle the cancerous disease, which starts in the white blood cells called lymphocytes. It causes uncontrollable cell reproduction that can potentially invade other tissues throughout the body and disrupt normal tissue function, according to the American Cancer Society. Sanders travels from Sallisaw to Tahlequah’s Northeast Oklahoma Cancer Center five days a week for his radiation sessions and will have checkups every three to six months after the treatments. “The radiation, they take you to a back room with a really big machine and you just lay on it, like a flat surface, and then they put a mesh mask over your face and tilt your head back so they can get to the spots where the cancer is. There’s no needles involved or anything. It’s just a big machine shooting radiation down on your body,” he said. The first time Sanders noticed something amiss with his health was in March 2017. “Every time I went running I noticed my breathing was off quite a bit, so I was just feeling around on my neck and I found these lumps on the right side of my neck, below my jaw. It was just affecting my breathing a lot, so I went to the doctor and had them check it out,” he said. After a PET scan and surgery, doctors removed two of Sanders’ lymph nodes. “They sent them off to be tested and they came back cancerous. They told me it was Stage 2 Hodgkin lymphoma and we started treatment last year in April,” Sanders said. Doctors prescribed Sanders four rounds of chemotherapy at Warren Clinic Medical Oncology in Tahlequah. “I was supposed to do four, but three rounds did it,” Sanders said. “During that time, I still went to work, and I didn’t feel good at all going to work, but I still worked my eight hours a day. I still went to work, put a smile on my face. I had a really good attitude about it.” Though the cancer has returned and forced Sanders to put classes at Carl Albert State College on hold while continuing to work, he remains positive and recommends anyone going through a diagnosis to do the same. “Just have a positive attitude about everything. Surround yourself with positive things, people, family and friends,” he said. Sanders has a GoFundMe account to help with expenses. To donate, visit <a href="http://www.gofundme.com/hodgkins-lymphoma-fight" target="_blank">www.gofundme.com/hodgkins-lymphoma-fight</a>. <strong>Symptoms and Info</strong> Possible symptoms of Hodgkin ymphoma include fever, drenching night sweats and weight loss constituting at least 10 percent of a person’s body weight over the course of six months, according to the American Cancer Society. For more information, visit <a href="www.cancer.org/cancer/hodgkin-lymphoma.html " target="_blank">www.cancer.org/cancer/hodgkin-lymphoma.html</a>.
BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
04/20/2018 08:30 AM
TAHLEQUAH – Northeastern State University’s Oklahoma College of Optometry goes back 39 years in its relationship with the Cherokee Nation and in providing Cherokees eye care. NSUOCO works with nine CN clinics, also known as Rural Eye Programs, in Tahlequah, Sallisaw, Stilwell, Jay, Salina, Vinita, Nowata, Muskogee and Ochelata and services 40,000 to 60,000 patients annually. Its first graduating class was in 1983 and has since averaged 28 graduates annually from its four-year doctorate program. The NSU campus clinic contains 20 exam rooms and specialty clinics for dry eye, contact lenses, low vision, vision therapy and infant vision clinic. If a REP is unable to provide a type of eye care, patients are sent to the NSU clinic for further evaluation and treatment. Nate Lighthizer, NSUOCO Continuing Medical Education director and doctor of optometry, said the college has seen patients from 2 months old to 102 years old. “We all have different vision needs. That’s one of the beauties of having a college is we have 35 faculty members that are either here, in (W.W.) Hastings (Hospital) or in the REPs, and a lot them have different interests. We have doctors that specialize in infant vision and vision therapy. They’re the expert in the 6-month-old and the 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-year-old. Other doctors, they’re the expert in the 80-year-olds,” Lighthizer said. He said students begin in “didactically heavy” classes, building foundations and learning about systemic diseases, eye diseases, procedures when giving primary care, looking at the eye with microscopes and other program aspects. He said students begin seeing patients at the end of the second year and into the third year. CN citizen and fourth-year student Seth Rich said he applied for the NSU program because of the experience it would give him treating patients by the time he graduates. “I’m from this area, so I wanted to serve basically in the population that I grew up in. Here at NSU we see more patients compared to any other optometry school by the time we graduate. We have more patient interactions that any other optometry school is going to have and more clinical experience because we start seeing patients a year early than most other schools,” he said. Rich said he also has experience using the REPs and seeing the eye care needs among Cherokees. “We deal with a lot of diabetic patients here at Cherokee Nation, and that has a really large effect on the eyes. Being able to be in this area and serve a population that has a huge need for us is a big deal because I personally have a lot of family ties to this area want to be in a community where I feel like I’m going to be contributing and giving back and helping the overall health of the population with health and exams,” he said. Rich said the program prepares students to “go out into the real world” and treat patients of any need. “I feel very confident going out into the population and serving basically anybody that walks in the door.” CN citizen Tara Comingdeer Fields, who is in her first year at NSUOCO, said she chose the program because of her area ties. “It’s not specifically just Cherokee Indians that I want to serve, but overall Native Americans. My background is I grew up in a traditional family, so the medicines and traditions that we did just kind of stuck with me, and now I want to help people.” Comingdeer Fields and Rich are recipients of Indian Health Services scholarships for optometry and will work under an IHS contract upon graduation. Lighthizer said CN citizens make up between 10 to 15 percent of the NSUOCO’s students and that it’s usually rewarding for a Cherokee to grow up using CN eye care services and then go through the program and become a provider. “It’s just a very mutually beneficial relationship between Cherokee Nation to be able to have all of these patients seen and then obviously for the education for students to be able to see patients and hone their skills.”
BY STAFF REPORTS
04/19/2018 04:00 PM
SANTA ANA PUEBLO, N.M. – The Notah Begay III (NB3) Foundation, with a grant from the Comcast Foundation and in partnership with Cultivating Coders, is accepting applications for a national competition for Native youth to design a mobile app focusing on improving the health and nutrition of Native youth – designed by Native youth. The competition is open to individuals or teams of Native youth, ages 13-18, experienced in coding, design and digital media and/or mobile technology. Participants must submit a completed application with supporting documents that includes a four-page outline and video of the app. Contest applications will be accepted until July 1. Learn about the contest criteria, eligibility and application process at: <a href="http://www.nb3foundation.org/healthy-kids-healthy-futures-app-contest/" target="_blank">http://www.nb3foundation.org/healthy-kids-healthy-futures-app-contest/</a>. “The NB3 Foundation recognizes that more and more Native youth are using their mobile devices and APPs to track their physical activity, nutrition and even water intake. This competition is an integral step for the Foundation in the direction of connecting youth with technology to build healthier lifestyles,” NB3 Foundation President and CEO Justin Kii Huenemann, said. The contest’s intent is to engage and challenge creative and tech-savvy Native youth from across Indian Country to think creatively, culturally and digitally about their diet, nutrition, exercise and fitness; and turn that knowledge into a solution or problem-solving mobile app that may be used by the NB3 Foundation. A panel of NB3 Foundation staff and experts will choose a first-, second- and third-place winners. The first-place winner will proceed to work with Cultivating Coders, a software company and social enterprise focused on priming the next generation of coders to develop, design and implement their own solutions to address their local challenges, to further develop the app into a minimum viable product. For more information or questions about the application process, email Simone Duran, NB3 Foundation program assistant, at <a href="mailto: simone@nb3f.org">simone@nb3f.org</a> or call 505-867-0775, ext. 104.
BY STAFF REPORTS
04/17/2018 08:00 AM
VINITA – The Cherokee Nation’s Behavioral Health is using federal grants to train law enforcement, youth workers and health officials to better handle mental illness. Behavioral Health special projects officer Tonya Boone, a certified instructor, has led eight classes, including her most recent adult mental health first-aid class at the CN Vinita Health Center. “I was certified in August of 2017 and have since certified around 150 individuals,” Boone said. More than 20 people from CN Health Services and surrounding health care agencies were involved in the most recent training in Vinita. During the eight-hour course, participants memorized a five-step action plan and were taught how to identify mental health risk factors, offer support and be effective communicators. Only about 5,000 instructors nationwide are certified to teach mental health first aid, including six from the CN. Behavioral Health Clinic Administrator Joni Lyon said for her team of certified instructors it is about more than training. It’s about making a difference in the lives of those who may be suffering from a mental illness or substance abuse. “We are invested in providing education and information for our communities regarding mental health and substance abuse,” Lyon said. “Our department acknowledges that Cherokee Nation is not exempt from these types of issues and wants to ensure our communities are provided with appropriate information and education to assist persons seeking services in their community.” All five courses, funded through a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration grant and the Indian Health Service, teach specific risk factors and warning signs of mental illness and how they relate to an emergency situation. Instructors can be certified in any of the courses and certifications must be renewed every three years. So far in 2018, the tribe has certified more than 100 participants in mental health first aid and was expected to offer four classes relating to youth at the Jack Brown Youth Treatment Center in Tahlequah in April. Behavioral Health offers various services to all federally recognized tribal citizens, including specialized services for women, individual and group therapy for mental health and substance abuse, relapse prevention, children and family treatment and parenting classes. In addition to counseling, the department handles psychological testing for children and adults. For CN citizens living within the tribe’s jurisdictional boundaries, referral services for substance abuse and psychiatric stabilization are also available. For more information on mental health first-aid training, visit <a href="http://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.com" target="_blank">www.mentalhealthfirstaid.com</a>.