Back in the day: 1997

BY CHEROKEE ADVOCATE
08/28/2015 08:30 AM
Reprinted from the July/August 1997 Cherokee Advocate, Volume XXI, No. 7-8.

Concert, Car Show and Bike Ride Added to Cherokee Holiday

A concert, a car show and a bike ride have been added to the line-up of events for the 45th Cherokee National Holiday, Labor Day weekend, Aug. 28-31, in Tahlequah, Okla.

The concert will feature Native American musicians, performing a variety of musical styles including blues, rock, reggae, traditional and contemporary. Performers include Wes Studi (Cherokee) and his new band, Firecat of Discord; Smiling’ Vic (Creek) and the Soul Monkeys; Knifewing (Chiricahua Apache); Farmboy, featuring Tanya Comingdeer (Cherokee) and Tom Skinner; and Elvus Gene Kishketon (absentee Shawnee).

Performers will take the stage at the Cherokee Cultural Grounds at 1 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 31. The music will continue until midnight, with breaks between performances featuring comedians. The concert will conclude with a fireworks extravaganza.
Lillie O'Fields Saunty of Shawnee looks over her gifts with help from Cherokee Nation Deputy Chief Garland Eagle, left, and Prinicipal Chief Joe Byrd. Saunty is among nine original Dawes Commission enrollees who were honored Saturday during the Cherokee National Holiday. LYNN ADAIR/CHEROKEE ADVOCATE John Belt of Tahlequah takes careful aim at a target 45 feet away during the annual blowgun competition. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE ADVOCATE Fending off a spike, a volleyball player rises in the air but is unable to bat back the ball. Teams from throughout the area competed in the holiday volleyball tournament. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE ADVOCATE Cherokee boys study a new blowgun on the lawn of the Cherokee Heritage Center. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE ADVOCATE People of all ages took part in the stickball exhibitions that took place at Sequoyah High School. SAMMY STILL/CHEROKEE ADVOCATE Badwater Fields, Issac Youngbird, Larry Crittenden and Richard Fields of Kansas, Okla., won the Cherokee National Holiday Marble Tournament. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE ADVOCATE
Lillie O'Fields Saunty of Shawnee looks over her gifts with help from Cherokee Nation Deputy Chief Garland Eagle, left, and Prinicipal Chief Joe Byrd. Saunty is among nine original Dawes Commission enrollees who were honored Saturday during the Cherokee National Holiday. LYNN ADAIR/CHEROKEE ADVOCATE
http://cherokeepublichealth.org/

Back in the day: 1976

BY THE CHEROKEE NATION NEWS
08/14/2015 02:00 PM
24th Annual Holiday To Be Long Remembered

Reprinted from The Cherokee Nation News, Volume 9, Number 37
September 10, 1976



The 24th Annual Cherokee National Holiday scheduled for September 3, 4, and 5, 1976 was one to be long remembered. From the time that Arts and Crafts show opened Friday until the fire died out at the final stomp dance Sunday night there was a continual round of activities.

Six beautiful Cherokee girls competed for the title “Miss Cherokee” and presented their talents. Friday evening then followed by Gospel singing.

Tahlequah riding club. COMMUNICATIONS CENTER & THE CHEROKEE NATION NEWS Miss Cherokee candidates breakfast, from left, Chief Ross Swimmer, Neal Morton and LaVeda Lay. COMMUNICATIONS CENTER & THE CHEROKEE NATION NEWS Candidates for "Miss Cherokee" 1976-1977. Left to right: Johnnie Marie England of Stilwell; Julie Dean Sellick of Spavinaw; Beverly Justice of Tahlequah; Margaret Elaine Waugh of Jay; Cynthia Blackfox of Tahlequah; Caroline Diana Mouse of Salina. COMMUNICATIONS CENTER & THE CHEROKEE NATION NEWS Ella Still, oldest original enrollee, great grand daughter of Chief John Ross, recieved an Indian blanket from Lewis Swindler and Jack Baker. COMMUNICATIONS CENTER & THE CHEROKEE NATION NEWS Favorite sport of the early days - cornstalk shoot. COMMUNICATIONS CENTER & THE CHEROKEE NATION NEWS Stickball game between Cherokee, North Carolina team and Cherokee Nation. The race is on. COMMUNICATIONS CENTER & THE CHEROKEE NATION NEWS The winner of the terrapin race, son of Brandon Ray Squirrel. COMMUNICATIONS CENTER & THE CHEROKEE NATION NEWS
Tahlequah riding club. COMMUNICATIONS CENTER & THE CHEROKEE NATION NEWS

Culture

Descendants of Cherokee Seminaries award 2 scholarships
BY KENLEA HENSON
Reporter
05/18/2018 08:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH – Every year on May 7 the Descendants of the Cherokee Seminaries Students Organization hold its annual reunion at Northeastern State University where it awards two NSU students with scholarships. This year’s recipients were Cherokee Nation citizens Bryley Hoodenpyle and Marilyn Tschida.

Both students received a $1,000 scholarship based on their GPAs, activities and interviews.

Hoodenpyle said her fourth great-grandmother’s aunt and two cousins attended the Cherokee Male and Female seminaries, which she discovered through online research and NSU’s archives. She said after college she plans to attend NSU’s optometry school.

“It means a lot to me to receive this scholarship just because this university has given so much to me and has helped me grow personally,” Hoodenpyle said. “NSU has developed me as a student and as a leader so its really awesome to me that my family played a part in that story however many years ago.”

Tschida is an education graduate student and plans to graduate in December. She said she found her grandmother’s name in the Cherokee Female Seminary roll book in NSU’s archives and decided to apply for the scholarship.

“I am really proud to accept it, I think she would be very proud for me to have gotten something on her behalf,” Tschida said.

On May 7, 1889, the Cherokee Female Seminary reopened north of Tahlequah after a fire destroyed it two years earlier. So, no matter what day May 7 falls on, the descendants of students who attended the Cherokee Male and Female seminaries gather to honor their ancestors and their time at the schools.

DCSSO President Rick Ward said the reunion is the oldest tradition on NSU’s campus, accruing annually for 167 years with the exception of one year during World War II.

“It started out as a picnic, but it wasn’t the descendants getting together it was the actual students of the seminaries coming together, bringing food and visiting out in front of the sycamore tree,” he said.

After noticing the number seminary students fading away, Jack Brown established the DCSSO in 1975. Brown served as the executive vice president of the Cherokee Seminaries Students Alumni Association for years. He wanted to get the descendants of the alumni involved in the activities of the association as well as keep the tradition alive. In 1984 the name officially changed to the Descendants of Cherokee Seminaries Students Organization.

The state bought the Female Seminary in 1909, which now serves as Seminary Hall and the centerpiece of NSU.

DCSSO Secretary Ginny Wilson said she wants to keep the reunion tradition alive for her grandmother, who was a student at the Female Seminary.

“I do this for my grandmother. We used to bring her up here to this reunion. It was always the one thing in her life she wanted to do,” Wilson said.

Wilson said the DCSSO follows the same format as their ancestors did during their reunions, which consists of the organization’s meeting, lunch, a speaker, the Cherokee choir and Miss Cherokee.

“We follow that format as close as we can to just do the same thing. It’s gotten a whole lot smaller, but that’s what we do as descendants in memory of those people,” she said.

Since the DCSSO established a scholarship for students who are descendants in the early 2000s, its goal is to continue to provide that scholarship.

“Our biggest plan is to increase our scholarship amount. That’s the most important, but also to keep the (May 7) tradition going at Northeastern. Otherwise it will die,” Wilson said.

Education

Sequoyah Schools hosting basketball camps
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/21/2018 04:00 PM
TAHELQUAH – Sequoyah Schools is again offering summer basketball camps for girls and boys who will be in first through ninth grades in the fall.

The camps are designed to help youngsters develop skills, master techniques and learn basic concepts of basketball. Sequoyah coaches and members of the Sequoyah high school basketball teams instruct the camps.

The boys’ camp is May 29-31 at The Place Where They Play gym located on the Sequoyah campus. Grades first through fifth camps will be held from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m., while grades sixth through ninth will be held from noon to 3 p.m.

For more information on the boys’ camp, call coach Jay Herrin at 918-822-0835.

The girls’ camp will be held June 4-6 at The Place Where They Play gym. Grades first through fifth camps will be held from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m., and grades sixth through ninth will be held from noon to 3 p.m.

For more information on the girls’ camp, call Larry Callison at 918-557-8335.

Registration forms and fees may be turned in to coaches Herrin and Callison ahead of time or on the first day of camp. Early registration is appreciated.

Free lunches will be available for both camps and all age groups from 11 a.m. to noon in the school cafeteria.

These will be the only youth basketball camps offered at Sequoyah this year. To view the information online visit http://sequoyah.cherokee.org/Athletics/Summer-Youth-Camps/Basketball-Camps.

Click hereto download the boys' camp registration form.

Click hereto download the girls' camp registration form.

Council

Smith, Golden honored with CN Patriotism medals
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/20/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation honored U.S. Army and Navy veterans with the tribe’s Medal of Patriotism during the March 12 Tribal Council meeting.

Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden acknowledged Fields Smith, 84, of Vian, and Kenneth Golden, 68, of Stilwell, for their service to the country.

Sgt. Smith was born in 1933 and drafted into the Army in 1955. He completed basic training at Fort Chaffee in Arkansas and trained to become an infantryman. Later, he completed Fire Directing Control School and was sent to Fort Polk in Louisiana where he spent the remainder of his two-year service term. During his service, Smith completed non-commission school and received a sharpshooter medal for his rifle skills. Smith received an honorable discharge in 1957.

“I want to thank the Chief, the Deputy Chief and the Tribal Council for all of the good work that they do for our people,” Smith said.

Sgt. Golden was born in 1949 and enlisted in the Navy in 1968. Golden completed basic training in Chicago. After basic training, he was transferred to the Naval Air Station Cecil Field in Jacksonville, Florida, where he served as an aviation boatman mate. During his service, Golden was awarded the National Defense Service Medal and received an honorable discharge in 1972.

Each month the CN recognizes Cherokee service men and women for their sacrifices and as a way to demonstrate the high regard in which the tribe holds all veterans.

To nominate a veteran who is a CN citizen, call 918-772-4166.

Health

CN dietitian receives ‘Outstanding Dietitian of the Year’ award
BY STAFF REPORTS
04/27/2018 04:00 PM
TULSA – Cherokee Nation clinical dietitian Tonya Swim was awarded “Outstanding Dietitian of the Year for Outstanding Career of Contributions to the Dietetics Profession” on April 19 at the Oklahoma Academy of Nutrition and Dietetic Convention.

Swim, who works at the A-Mo Health Center in Salina, is involved with the OkAND organization as public relations and communication chairwoman and has helped increase its social media presence by promoting registered dietitians as nutrition experts and renewing a partnership with Oklahoma City Fox News by coordinating weekly cooking segments.

She also served as chairwoman for the 2018 OkAND convention and chaired the event in 2016. As chairwoman, she worked to provide Oklahoma’s registered dietitians and dietetic technicians with opportunities for continuing education.

“It was an honor and I am humbled to have received this award. I give most of the credit to the amazing group of dietitians in our state for helping my ideas become reality and to the wonderful company I work for in allowing me to grow as a dietician. I am so blessed with a supportive family who push me to be the best I can. Thank you to everyone,” Swim said.

Opinion

OPINION: Is it time for a technology detox?
BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
05/01/2018 02:00 PM
According to a recent Time magazine article, every day we check our smartphones about 47 times – about every 19 minutes – while spending approximately five hours on them.

It states there’s “no good consensus” about what that does to our “children’s brains” or “adolescents’ moods.” It also states the American Psychological Association has found that 65 percent of people believe “periodically unplugging would improve our mental health,” and a University of Texas study has found the “mere presence of our smartphones, face down on the desk in front of us, undercuts our ability to perform basic cognitive tasks.”

It further states that it’s not just us being weak for not getting away from our screens; our brains are being engineered to keep looking. Silicon Valley’s business model relies on us looking at their apps and products. The more “eyeball time” we give, the more money they make by selling our personal data. The article states we “are not customers of Facebook or Google, we are the product being sold.”

This is persuasive technology, the study of how computers are used to control our thoughts and actions. It “has fueled the creation of thousands of apps, interfaces and devices that deliberately encourage certain human behaviors (keep scrolling) while discouraging others (convey thoughtful, nuanced ideas),” the article states.

The article adds that Facebook “designers determine which videos, news stories and friends’ comments appear at the top of your feed, as well as how often you’re informed of new notifications.” The goal is to keep us looking longer, thus getting more personal info on us to their real customers – companies that buy this information.

It also states when our brains gets an “external cue, like the ding of a Facebook notification, that often precedes a reward,” there’s a burst of dopamine, a powerful neurotransmitter linked to the anticipation of pleasure.” This “trigger, action and reward” process strengthens the brain’s habit-forming loop.

“If you’re trying to get someone to establish a new behavior…computer engineers can draw on different kinds of positive feedback, like social approval or a sense of progress, to build on that loop,” the article states. “One simple trick is to offer users a reward, like points or a cascade of new likes from friends at unpredictable times. The human brain produces more dopamine when it anticipates a reward but doesn’t know when it will arrive…Most of the alluring apps and websites in wide use today were engineered to exploit this habit-forming loop.”

Pinterest works slightly different. It features pictures arranged so that users see partial images of what’s next. This piques the curiosity and has no “natural” stopping point, the article states, while offering endless content.

Not too many years ago, I could go most places without my cell. Nowadays I usually have it with me. Am I going to miss a call or text? What’s happening on Facebook? I need to text my buddy about the game I just saw, or that photo I just took needs posting.

Recently I read an article (again in Time) about a museum that annually holds an exhibit in which famous pieces of art are recreated with flowers. The museum considered banning cell phones because people would push and shove trying to get pictures. One woman said she felt guilty for simply looking at the art because she thought she was in the way of people trying to take pictures with their phones.

I don’t want to be one of those people who views life through a smartphone or tablet. Nor do I want my kids to be. But I can’t tell them to put down the screens if I can’t do it. I guess it’s time for a “tech detox” as Time magazine called it. I’ve decided to limit my screen time and start getting the bulk of my news again from print. (I can’t stand TV news.) I subscribe to Time, Runner’s World, Men’s Health and will most likely go back to a daily newspaper. I like the feel of pages between my fingers. I like how I can read it at any pace, set it down and come back to it. True, it’s delivered at a slower pace than digital news, but it’s usually more in-depth with better design.

I need to unplug for a while. I think my kids are at that point, too, and probably my wife. Maybe it’s time for a lot of us to re-evaluate our screen time and break those habit-forming loops.

People

Highers graduates OU Economic Development Institute
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/17/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Cherokee Nation citizen and employee Stephen Highers on May 3 graduated from the University of Oklahoma Economic Development Institute.

“Having graduated from the OU EDI program, I can now set for the test to become a Certified Economic Developer through the International Economic Development Council,” CN Entrepreneur Development Manager Stephen Highers said.

According to the IEDC website, it’s a nonprofit, nonpartisan membership organization serving economic developers. It also states that with more than 5,000 members, the IEDC is the largest organization of its kind.

“Economic developers promote economic well-being and quality of life for their communities, by creating, retaining and expanding jobs that facilitate growth, enhance wealth and provide a stable tax base,” the site states. “From public to private, rural to urban and local to international, IEDC’s members are engaged in the full range of economic development experience.”

Highers, who also serves as a Tahlequah city councilor, said he was excited to bring back knowledge he gained at the OU EDI to Tahlequah.

“Economic development is not easy, especially if you don’t understand the data and process by which to make informed, sound decision. Through my coursework and training at the OU EDI, I’m able to bring back to Tahlequah concrete ideas and solutions that will enhance our future growth in a healthy, competitive, and objective manner,” he said.

Highers said the program is a two-year program, and he has plans to become certified in the winter of 2019.

For more information, visit https://pacs.ou.edu/edi/about/.
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