TERO-certified Fourkiller Lawn Solutions keeps growing

BY KENLEA HENSON
Reporter
05/16/2018 08:15 AM
STILWELL – It started as a summer job in high school to make extra money. Today 24-year-old Tyler Fourkiller has a growing lawn and landscaping business called Fourkiller Lawn Solutions that manages more than 140 residential and commercial accounts in eastern Oklahoma and northwest Arkansas.

The Cherokee Nation citizen started mowing lawns as a teenager, looking for a way to make cash to buy hunting gear. He started out with a used zero-turn mower his father bought him and a push mower he borrowed from his grandfather. He hauled the mowers around on a small trailer and began mowing five residential lawns. By the next summer, he had a couple more lawns to mow, and by the third summer he gained a few more lawns and was able to save up enough money to buy his own mower.

After high school, Fourkiller went to college to play baseball, and his summer lawn work slowed down. It wasn’t until after he graduated from college that things started to “snowball” for him.

With a degree in environmental and safety management, Fourkiller wanted to go into the oil and gas field, but the industry wasn’t doing great at the time, so he decided to start a full-time lawn business.

“I was like I’m just going to run with it and see what happens,” he said.
Cherokee Nation citizen Tyler Fourkiller, owner of Fourkiller Lawn Solutions, is a certified vendor for the CN’s Tribal Employment Rights Office. Fourkiller has provided lawn and landscape services for CN entities and for customers throughout eastern Oklahoma and northwest Arkansas.  KENLEA HENSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Fourkiller Lawn Solutions employees install sod at a residential home. Cherokee Nation citizen Tyler Fourkiller owns and operates the lawn and landscaping business. COURTESY Fourkiller Lawn Solutions employees work on a landscaping project at a residential home. Cherokee Nation citizen Tyler Fourkiller started mowing lawns as a teenager looking for a way to make some cash to buy new hunting gear. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation citizen Tyler Fourkiller, owner of Fourkiller Lawn Solutions, is a certified vendor for the CN’s Tribal Employment Rights Office. Fourkiller has provided lawn and landscape services for CN entities and for customers throughout eastern Oklahoma and northwest Arkansas. KENLEA HENSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
http://cherokeepublichealth.org/

First Peoples Fund training teaches Native artists entrepreneurship

BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Reporter – @cp_bbennett
04/11/2018 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH – Seasoned and newly emerging Cherokee artists gained business information during a Native Artist Professional Development Training on April 4-5 at the Cherokee Arts Center.

The First Peoples Fund hosted the training as part of its community workshop program, and its goal is to help Native artists become successful entrepreneurs. The FPF provided the course materials while Cherokee artists Matthew Anderson and MaryBeth Timothy taught the training.

“Most of us don’t have that business mind, and so First Peoples Fund comes in and helps us with that,” Timothy said. “I know with me, when I took the First Peoples Fund training here it just opened my eyes to so many things that I wasn’t sure of. Now that I realize that we have so many resources, I’m not afraid to go out and look and ask for help, and I think that’s really important for a lot of artists around here."

Training topics included creating a business plan, writing for grants and loans, marketing, crafting a successful portfolio and balancing time between operating a business and being an artist. Each participant was also asked to give a presentation at the training’s end.

“It’s a chance for them to step outside the box,” Timothy said. “Some of them have never done that before, and so we give them a little guideline and it shows how to present yourself because part of this whole thing is not just selling your art, you’re selling yourself.”
Video Frame selected by Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizens MaryBeth Timothy, standing, and Matthew Anderson, sitting right, lead the Native Artist Professional Development Training on April 4-5 at the Cherokee Arts Center in Tahlequah. The training is a program offered by the First Peoples Fund, and its goal is to help Native artists become successful entrepreneurs. BRITTNEY BENNETT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee Nation citizen MaryBeth Timothy, standing, outlines the difference in standard marketing models and marketing models for Native artists while leading an entrepreneurship course on April 5 in Tahlequah. The First Peoples Fund developed all educational materials and presentations used. BRITTNEY BENNETT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee Nation citizen Isaiah Soap attends the Native Artist Professional Development Training with educational materials full of tips and advice for Native artists. He said he attended the training to learn from more established artists about how to set up a business to sell his beadwork. BRITTNEY BENNETT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizens MaryBeth Timothy, standing, and Matthew Anderson, sitting right, lead the Native Artist Professional Development Training on April 4-5 at the Cherokee Arts Center in Tahlequah. The training is a program offered by the First Peoples Fund, and its goal is to help Native artists become successful entrepreneurs. BRITTNEY BENNETT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Cherokee mother-daughter team opens 2 businesses

BY ROGER GRAHAM
Multimedia Producer – @cp_rgraham
04/03/2018 08:30 AM
VIAN – Less than a mile from Interstate 40 and 5 miles from Lake Tenkiller, two Cherokee-owned businesses are thriving in Vian.

Morning Sky Boutique and Evening Shade Mercantile are the idea of Cherokee Nation citizens Suzanne Sullivan and Callie Prier, who are also mother and daughter.

“We opened this store (Morning Sky Boutique) a little over three years ago, and we carry clothing, jewelry, shoes,” Prier, the daughter, said. “And we have another building, Evening Shade Mercantile, and it’s home and gift.”

Prier said her family worked together to make the idea a reality.

“Well, originally we bought Morning Sky Boutique, which was the old Vian Sundry Store and many things before that. My mom and I purchased the building. My husband remodeled the building,” she said.
Video Frame selected by Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizens and mother and daughter Suzanne Sullivan, left, and Callie Prier stand in their Morning Sky Boutique located at 106 S. Thornton St. in Vian. STACIE BOSTON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX The Morning Sky Boutique and Evening Shade Mercantile in Vian are the ideas of Cherokee Nation citizens Suzanne Sullivan and Callie Prier, who are also mother and daughter. STACIE BOSTON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizens and mother and daughter Suzanne Sullivan, left, and Callie Prier stand in their Morning Sky Boutique located at 106 S. Thornton St. in Vian. STACIE BOSTON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
https://www.facebook.com/CASA-of-Cherokee-Country-184365501631027/

Limitless Nutrition brings nutrition store to Fort Gibson

BY KENLEA HENSON
Reporter
04/02/2018 12:00 PM
FORT GIBSON – Cherokee Nation citizen Jon Griggs and his friend, Alex Miller, co-own Limitless Nutrition, which recently opened as a one-stop nutrition shop.

The two former basketball players said they’ve always been into fitness, which led to an interest in nutrition and a desire to open a nutrition store. Griggs, who is also a real estate agent, said he learned of a storefront rental listing and he could not “pass it up.”

“We talked about doing a business together for about seven years. We initially thought about opening a gym, but over the years we realized the importance in fueling your body the right way. Your physical and mental output is heavily dependent on your nutrition intake,” Griggs said. “So our purpose is to provide a healthy solution to anyone interested in improving their health, fitness, mental or physical performance or overall self-image.”

Limitless Nutrition is located at 1205 S. Lee St. It offers everything from fitness advice and supplements to nutritional smoothies, shakes and teas, Griggs said.

He said they offer pre-workout supplements, proteins, multivitamins, fat burners, natural herbs, energy teas, all-natural skin care products and nootropics, a brain booster for focus and energy. He also said they carry supplement brands to cater to costumers. “We are pretty unlimited to what we can get and what we can carry. If we don’t carry a certain product you’re looking for, we will get it for you.”
Cherokee Nation citizen and co-owner of Limitless Nutrition Jon Griggs, SouljaFit owner P.J. Cowan and co-owner of Limitless Nutrition Alex Miller stand in front of the Limitless Nutrition sign during the business' recent ribbon-cutting in Fort Gibson. COURTESY The smoothie bar inside Limitless Nutrition in Fort Gibson offers fitness and nutritional smoothies made with real fruit flavoring. People can choose smoothies designed specially for them by choosing a smoothie, a flavor and a boost from the menu. KENLEA HENSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Limitless Nutrition in Fort Gibson offers health and performance supplements. It also carries top brands including SouljaFit, GAT, Results Nutrition and Maad’m Muscle, a women’s supplement line. KENLEA HENSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen and co-owner of Limitless Nutrition Jon Griggs, SouljaFit owner P.J. Cowan and co-owner of Limitless Nutrition Alex Miller stand in front of the Limitless Nutrition sign during the business' recent ribbon-cutting in Fort Gibson. COURTESY

Cherokee-owned SSLG Trading Group opens

BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
03/13/2018 08:00 AM
LOCUST GROVE – The Cherokee-owned SSLG Trading Group celebrated the grand opening of its family-owned housewares resale business with a ribbon cutting on March 5.

SSLG stands for Susan (Standingwater), Stephanie (Standingwater-Cutrer), Lawrence (Standingwater) and Gabriel (Cutrer). Located at 524 E. Main St., it’s open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 8 a.m. to noon on Saturday.

Standingwater-Cutrer and her father, Lawrence, are Cherokee Nation citizens who worked with their spouses to open the business, which started from the back of a truck and has upgraded to a storefront.

The store merchandise sells at lower-than-retail pricing, she said. “At the start of it we bought palletized general merchandise from a warehouse in Arkansas, and it was from major retailers, and we were able to buy it at a decent price. So I decided at that moment that everything I was going to offer for people to buy was going to be half or less (than retail).”

Its merchandise includes kitchenware, tables, television stands, dressers, cell phones cases, books and clothing that one can find in Wal-Mart, Costco, Cato’s or Bill’s Sporting Goods, she said.
Stephanie Standingwater-Cutrer, a Cherokee Nation citizen and SSLG Trading Group co-owner, front left, cuts the ribbon with her husband, dad, stepmother and community members at the store’s grand opening on March 5 in Locust Grove. The store sells housewares items and general merchandise at lower-than-retail pricing. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Patrons browse for merchandise at the March 5 grand opening of SSLG Trading Group in Locust Grove. Co-owner Stephanie Standingwater-Cutrer said the business stems from wanting to add diversity to the town’s business sector. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX A banner hangs above the entry of the SSLG Trading Group in Locust Grove, which is a Cherokee-owned family business that resells housewares and general merchandise. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Stephanie Standingwater-Cutrer, a Cherokee Nation citizen and SSLG Trading Group co-owner, front left, cuts the ribbon with her husband, dad, stepmother and community members at the store’s grand opening on March 5 in Locust Grove. The store sells housewares items and general merchandise at lower-than-retail pricing. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Anderson, Payton among Leadership Native Oklahoma class

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
03/08/2018 08:00 AM
OKLAHOMA CITY – Two Cherokee Nation citizens were recently announced as participants of the American Indian Chamber of Commerce of Oklahoma’s 2018 Leadership Native Oklahoma class.

Amber Anderson, a University of Oklahoma Health Services Center research epidemiologist, and Brandi Payton, a CN Cooweescoowee Health Center administrator, join 41 other 2018 LNO participants.

According to the AICCO, the LNO is a “leadership opportunity” for business and governmental leaders in Indian Country to broaden their networks and sharpen their understanding of self-governance and self-determination.

“I am very appreciative and excited to be selected for this year’s cohort of Leadership Native Oklahoma. Past program participants have shared some of their experiences and I am looking forward to collaborating with Native leaders throughout the state,” Anderson said. “Most importantly, my hope is that I will come out of this program with new knowledge, relationships, and skills to better equip me in my effort to help improve the health of our Cherokee people and Indian County.”

Payton, who in 2015 helped open the Washington County-based Cooweescoowee Health Center, said she’s also dedicated to the betterment of health for the American Indian population, and it has become the focus of her professional life. She’s also taken interest in tribal sovereignty and policy after finishing a fellowship in 2016 with the National Congress of American Indians in Washington, D.C.
Amber Anderson Brandi Payton
Amber Anderson

CHEROKEE EATS: Okie Joe’s BBQ

BY STACIE BOSTON
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
03/01/2018 10:00 AM
STILWELL – After graduating college in Colorado, Joe Fletcher returned to Oklahoma looking to make his next move.

He noticed some barbecue trucks popping up in Arkansas in towns such as Fort Smith and Fayetteville. This made him want to try this new-style eatery in Oklahoma, which led him to start Okie Joe’s BBQ in 2005.

“We had seen them, kind of, this new-style thing, so we decided we’d build one and just try it and see what happened,” he said. “So we actually started up in (West) Siloam (Springs) and stayed there about a year and moved back to Stilwell, where we didn’t know if it would make it or not, and 13 years later here we are.”

Fletcher said Okie Joe’s menu began with items such as brisket sandwiches and baked beans, but has expanded to include other smoked choices.

“We have a Super Okie Baked Potato now where we take a baked potato, open it up, pile it full of meat, cover it with cheese. We have our Okie Joe sandwich. That’s our signature sandwich. It’s got all four meats on it: a slice of bologna, a link cut up and then a little bit of beef, a little bit of pork,” he said.
Video Frame selected by Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizen Joe Fletcher, owner of Okie Joe’s BBQ in Stilwell, kneels near his smoker as food cooks. Fletcher began Okie Joe’s in 2005 and says he’s known for his brisket sandwich. his fan favorites are the Okie Joe sandwich and the Super Okie Baked Potato. STACIE BOSTON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Joe Fletcher, owner of Okie Joe’s BBQ in Stilwell, kneels near his smoker as food cooks. Fletcher began Okie Joe’s in 2005 and says he’s known for his brisket sandwich. his fan favorites are the Okie Joe sandwich and the Super Okie Baked Potato. STACIE BOSTON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Woodsman Trading Co. helps people connect with outdoors

BY STACIE BOSTON
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
02/15/2018 08:00 AM
OKLAHOMA CITY – A love for the outdoors prompted Cherokee Nation citizen Gaylon Cornsilk and his brother-in-law Travis Smith to create Woodsman Trading Co., an outdoor lifestyle store.

The two opened on Nov. 26 to share their love for nature.

“We’re kind of an old-fashioned store. We really try to emphasize quality goods,” Cornsilk said. “If we don’t believe in it, we don’t sell it. If I sell something here, I’ve used it, tried it. I know it inside and out.”

Cornsilk’s love for the outdoors began at a young age when he and his father spent three months camping in Alaska and Canada. “I think it kind of put something in my heart that I never forgot.”

Located at The Village, Cornsilk said it’s a kind of store not “typically” seen in the area.
Video Frame selected by Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizen Gaylon Cornsilk stands among items in the Woodsman Trading Co. at The Village in Oklahoma City. Cornsilk is the co-owner of the store alongside his brother-in-law Travis Smith. The duo used their experiences with the outdoors and decided to open the store in November. STACIE BOSTON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX A hat with artwork from artist Abby Paffrath sits on display at the Woodsman Trading Co. at The Village in Oklahoma City. Cherokee Nation citizen Gaylon Cornsilk, Woodsman co-owner, says he strives to help promote other small businesses by featuring their wares at the store. STACIE BOSTON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX From knives, backpacks and water bottles, the Woodsman Trading Co. at The Village in Oklahoma City has products to fit the needs of the everyday explorer. STACIE BOSTON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Gaylon Cornsilk stands among items in the Woodsman Trading Co. at The Village in Oklahoma City. Cornsilk is the co-owner of the store alongside his brother-in-law Travis Smith. The duo used their experiences with the outdoors and decided to open the store in November. STACIE BOSTON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Gladd uses CN-owned racehorse training center

BY KENLEA HENSON
Reporter
02/13/2018 12:00 PM
SALLISAW – The former horseracing track Blue Ribbon Downs has continued to serve racehorse trainers from all over, including Cherokee Nation citizen Andy Gladd.

Gladd said because the majority of people who “run” horses in the community are Cherokee, it’s good to see the CN keep BRD open for training purposes.

Purchased from the Choctaw Nation for $2.5 million in December 2009, Cherokee Nation Entertainment opened the nearly 100-acre property as a racehorse-training center in late 2010.

It’s equipped with barns, stalls and a seven-eighths-of-a mile track, which can be rented for training. It has 354 stalls and currently has approximately 180 horses training there.

Gladd has owned his racehorse training business called Gladd Racing for nearly 12 years, but has used BRD for the past three years. He said at BRD he is able to rent stalls and use the track to run his horses for a better price than if he built a training facility.
Video Frame selected by Cherokee Phoenix
Cherokee Nation citizen and racehorse trainer Andy Gladd and assistant trainer Kassie Gladd (Cherokee/Shawnee), of Gladd Racing, stand in a barn where they keep their racehorses at the Cherokee Nation’s Blue Ribbon Downs Training Center grounds in Sallisaw. KENLEA HENSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee Nation citizen and racehorse trainer Andy Gladd, of Gladd Racing, leads one of his racehorses on the racing track at Cherokee Nation’s Blue Ribbon Downs Training Center in Sallisaw. KENLEA HENSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen and racehorse trainer Andy Gladd and assistant trainer Kassie Gladd (Cherokee/Shawnee), of Gladd Racing, stand in a barn where they keep their racehorses at the Cherokee Nation’s Blue Ribbon Downs Training Center grounds in Sallisaw. KENLEA HENSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Culture

Descendants of Cherokee Seminaries award 2 scholarships
BY KENLEA HENSON
Reporter
05/18/2018 08:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH – Every year on May 7 the Descendants of the Cherokee Seminaries Students Organization hold its annual reunion at Northeastern State University where it awards two NSU students with scholarships. This year’s recipients were Cherokee Nation citizens Bryley Hoodenpyle and Marilyn Tschida.

Both students received a $1,000 scholarship based on their GPAs, activities and interviews.

Hoodenpyle said her fourth great-grandmother’s aunt and two cousins attended the Cherokee Male and Female seminaries, which she discovered through online research and NSU’s archives. She said after college she plans to attend NSU’s optometry school.

“It means a lot to me to receive this scholarship just because this university has given so much to me and has helped me grow personally,” Hoodenpyle said. “NSU has developed me as a student and as a leader so its really awesome to me that my family played a part in that story however many years ago.”

Tschida is an education graduate student and plans to graduate in December. She said she found her grandmother’s name in the Cherokee Female Seminary roll book in NSU’s archives and decided to apply for the scholarship.

“I am really proud to accept it, I think she would be very proud for me to have gotten something on her behalf,” Tschida said.

On May 7, 1889, the Cherokee Female Seminary reopened north of Tahlequah after a fire destroyed it two years earlier. So, no matter what day May 7 falls on, the descendants of students who attended the Cherokee Male and Female seminaries gather to honor their ancestors and their time at the schools.

DCSSO President Rick Ward said the reunion is the oldest tradition on NSU’s campus, accruing annually for 167 years with the exception of one year during World War II.

“It started out as a picnic, but it wasn’t the descendants getting together it was the actual students of the seminaries coming together, bringing food and visiting out in front of the sycamore tree,” he said.

After noticing the number seminary students fading away, Jack Brown established the DCSSO in 1975. Brown served as the executive vice president of the Cherokee Seminaries Students Alumni Association for years. He wanted to get the descendants of the alumni involved in the activities of the association as well as keep the tradition alive. In 1984 the name officially changed to the Descendants of Cherokee Seminaries Students Organization.

The state bought the Female Seminary in 1909, which now serves as Seminary Hall and the centerpiece of NSU.

DCSSO Secretary Ginny Wilson said she wants to keep the reunion tradition alive for her grandmother, who was a student at the Female Seminary.

“I do this for my grandmother. We used to bring her up here to this reunion. It was always the one thing in her life she wanted to do,” Wilson said.

Wilson said the DCSSO follows the same format as their ancestors did during their reunions, which consists of the organization’s meeting, lunch, a speaker, the Cherokee choir and Miss Cherokee.

“We follow that format as close as we can to just do the same thing. It’s gotten a whole lot smaller, but that’s what we do as descendants in memory of those people,” she said.

Since the DCSSO established a scholarship for students who are descendants in the early 2000s, its goal is to continue to provide that scholarship.

“Our biggest plan is to increase our scholarship amount. That’s the most important, but also to keep the (May 7) tradition going at Northeastern. Otherwise it will die,” Wilson said.

Education

Oklahoma City weighs renaming 3 Confederate-named schools
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
05/18/2018 12:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – Three Oklahoma City schools named after Confederate generals may soon be renamed.

The school board on May 14 was expected to consider new names for Lee, Jackson Enterprise and Stand Watie elementary schools, which are named after Confederate generals Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan “Stonewall” Jackson and Isaac Stand Watie, a Cherokee.

Committees made up of community members, school staff and parents selected two potential names for each school, which were presented to students at each school who then voted on their preference, district spokeswoman Beth Harrison said.

The students’ choices will be presented for the board for approval, although the board could select any name it chooses, Harrison said.

The suggested names haven’t been made public.

Board member Carrie Coppernoll Jacobs told The Oklahoman that children and employees should feel welcome in the places where they learn and work.

“To make amends for the past, we have to own it,” she said. “School names may seem like a small gesture, but all progress has value,” Coppernoll Jacobs said.

The board voted in October to rename the schools following violent protests in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the removal of a Confederate statue.

The Tulsa school board recently renamed Robert E. Lee Elementary as Lee School, although critics say the change doesn’t go far enough. It also renamed Andrew Jackson Elementary as Unity Learning Academy.

The Oklahoma City board conducted an online survey for names and the names of Lee, Jackson and Watie received the most votes, while past state and local leaders were also popular.

The other names receiving votes include minster and former school board member Wayne Dempsey, educator and civil rights activist Clara Luper, writer and Oklahoma City native Ralph Ellison and Wilma Mankiller, who was the first woman to be principal chief of the Cherokee Nation.

The cost of changing the names is estimated at about $40,000, which a local attorney has agreed to pay.

Council

Smith, Golden honored with CN Patriotism medals
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/20/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation honored U.S. Army and Navy veterans with the tribe’s Medal of Patriotism during the March 12 Tribal Council meeting.

Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden acknowledged Fields Smith, 84, of Vian, and Kenneth Golden, 68, of Stilwell, for their service to the country.

Sgt. Smith was born in 1933 and drafted into the Army in 1955. He completed basic training at Fort Chaffee in Arkansas and trained to become an infantryman. Later, he completed Fire Directing Control School and was sent to Fort Polk in Louisiana where he spent the remainder of his two-year service term. During his service, Smith completed non-commission school and received a sharpshooter medal for his rifle skills. Smith received an honorable discharge in 1957.

“I want to thank the Chief, the Deputy Chief and the Tribal Council for all of the good work that they do for our people,” Smith said.

Sgt. Golden was born in 1949 and enlisted in the Navy in 1968. Golden completed basic training in Chicago. After basic training, he was transferred to the Naval Air Station Cecil Field in Jacksonville, Florida, where he served as an aviation boatman mate. During his service, Golden was awarded the National Defense Service Medal and received an honorable discharge in 1972.

Each month the CN recognizes Cherokee service men and women for their sacrifices and as a way to demonstrate the high regard in which the tribe holds all veterans.

To nominate a veteran who is a CN citizen, call 918-772-4166.

Health

CN dietitian receives ‘Outstanding Dietitian of the Year’ award
BY STAFF REPORTS
04/27/2018 04:00 PM
TULSA – Cherokee Nation clinical dietitian Tonya Swim was awarded “Outstanding Dietitian of the Year for Outstanding Career of Contributions to the Dietetics Profession” on April 19 at the Oklahoma Academy of Nutrition and Dietetic Convention.

Swim, who works at the A-Mo Health Center in Salina, is involved with the OkAND organization as public relations and communication chairwoman and has helped increase its social media presence by promoting registered dietitians as nutrition experts and renewing a partnership with Oklahoma City Fox News by coordinating weekly cooking segments.

She also served as chairwoman for the 2018 OkAND convention and chaired the event in 2016. As chairwoman, she worked to provide Oklahoma’s registered dietitians and dietetic technicians with opportunities for continuing education.

“It was an honor and I am humbled to have received this award. I give most of the credit to the amazing group of dietitians in our state for helping my ideas become reality and to the wonderful company I work for in allowing me to grow as a dietician. I am so blessed with a supportive family who push me to be the best I can. Thank you to everyone,” Swim said.

Opinion

OPINION: Is it time for a technology detox?
BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
05/01/2018 02:00 PM
According to a recent Time magazine article, every day we check our smartphones about 47 times – about every 19 minutes – while spending approximately five hours on them.

It states there’s “no good consensus” about what that does to our “children’s brains” or “adolescents’ moods.” It also states the American Psychological Association has found that 65 percent of people believe “periodically unplugging would improve our mental health,” and a University of Texas study has found the “mere presence of our smartphones, face down on the desk in front of us, undercuts our ability to perform basic cognitive tasks.”

It further states that it’s not just us being weak for not getting away from our screens; our brains are being engineered to keep looking. Silicon Valley’s business model relies on us looking at their apps and products. The more “eyeball time” we give, the more money they make by selling our personal data. The article states we “are not customers of Facebook or Google, we are the product being sold.”

This is persuasive technology, the study of how computers are used to control our thoughts and actions. It “has fueled the creation of thousands of apps, interfaces and devices that deliberately encourage certain human behaviors (keep scrolling) while discouraging others (convey thoughtful, nuanced ideas),” the article states.

The article adds that Facebook “designers determine which videos, news stories and friends’ comments appear at the top of your feed, as well as how often you’re informed of new notifications.” The goal is to keep us looking longer, thus getting more personal info on us to their real customers – companies that buy this information.

It also states when our brains gets an “external cue, like the ding of a Facebook notification, that often precedes a reward,” there’s a burst of dopamine, a powerful neurotransmitter linked to the anticipation of pleasure.” This “trigger, action and reward” process strengthens the brain’s habit-forming loop.

“If you’re trying to get someone to establish a new behavior…computer engineers can draw on different kinds of positive feedback, like social approval or a sense of progress, to build on that loop,” the article states. “One simple trick is to offer users a reward, like points or a cascade of new likes from friends at unpredictable times. The human brain produces more dopamine when it anticipates a reward but doesn’t know when it will arrive…Most of the alluring apps and websites in wide use today were engineered to exploit this habit-forming loop.”

Pinterest works slightly different. It features pictures arranged so that users see partial images of what’s next. This piques the curiosity and has no “natural” stopping point, the article states, while offering endless content.

Not too many years ago, I could go most places without my cell. Nowadays I usually have it with me. Am I going to miss a call or text? What’s happening on Facebook? I need to text my buddy about the game I just saw, or that photo I just took needs posting.

Recently I read an article (again in Time) about a museum that annually holds an exhibit in which famous pieces of art are recreated with flowers. The museum considered banning cell phones because people would push and shove trying to get pictures. One woman said she felt guilty for simply looking at the art because she thought she was in the way of people trying to take pictures with their phones.

I don’t want to be one of those people who views life through a smartphone or tablet. Nor do I want my kids to be. But I can’t tell them to put down the screens if I can’t do it. I guess it’s time for a “tech detox” as Time magazine called it. I’ve decided to limit my screen time and start getting the bulk of my news again from print. (I can’t stand TV news.) I subscribe to Time, Runner’s World, Men’s Health and will most likely go back to a daily newspaper. I like the feel of pages between my fingers. I like how I can read it at any pace, set it down and come back to it. True, it’s delivered at a slower pace than digital news, but it’s usually more in-depth with better design.

I need to unplug for a while. I think my kids are at that point, too, and probably my wife. Maybe it’s time for a lot of us to re-evaluate our screen time and break those habit-forming loops.

People

Highers graduates OU Economic Development Institute
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/17/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Cherokee Nation citizen and employee Stephen Highers on May 3 graduated from the University of Oklahoma Economic Development Institute.

“Having graduated from the OU EDI program, I can now set for the test to become a Certified Economic Developer through the International Economic Development Council,” CN Entrepreneur Development Manager Stephen Highers said.

According to the IEDC website, it’s a nonprofit, nonpartisan membership organization serving economic developers. It also states that with more than 5,000 members, the IEDC is the largest organization of its kind.

“Economic developers promote economic well-being and quality of life for their communities, by creating, retaining and expanding jobs that facilitate growth, enhance wealth and provide a stable tax base,” the site states. “From public to private, rural to urban and local to international, IEDC’s members are engaged in the full range of economic development experience.”

Highers, who also serves as a Tahlequah city councilor, said he was excited to bring back knowledge he gained at the OU EDI to Tahlequah.

“Economic development is not easy, especially if you don’t understand the data and process by which to make informed, sound decision. Through my coursework and training at the OU EDI, I’m able to bring back to Tahlequah concrete ideas and solutions that will enhance our future growth in a healthy, competitive, and objective manner,” he said.

Highers said the program is a two-year program, and he has plans to become certified in the winter of 2019.

For more information, visit https://pacs.ou.edu/edi/about/.
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