College Housing Assistance Program applications available July 23

BY STAFF REPORTS
07/16/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Housing Authority of the Cherokee Nation is accepting College Housing Assistance Program applications for the fall 2018 semester July 23 through Aug. 3.

The CHAP is a Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act-funded program designed to help low-income Native American students secure safe and affordable housing while seeking a first-time bachelor’s degree. Program participants must also maintain full-time student status at an accredited institute of higher education.

The CHAP will provide up to 125 students with up to $1,000 per semester for housing costs. Eligible applicants must be a member of a federally recognized tribe and be a resident of the Cherokee Nation jurisdiction. Applicants must also meet NAHASDA income guidelines as well as other eligibility requirements according to the CHAP policy. Priority will be given to CN citizens and students who were served on the program the previous semester.

Applications are available at www.hacn.org
or any HACN office location. For more information, call 918-456-5482.

Registration Office handles citizenship, CDIB queries

BY LANI HANSEN
Intern
07/16/2018 08:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation’s Registration Office stays busy year round receiving, processing and sending out CN citizenship and Certificate Degree Indian Blood cards to applicants.

Registration officials said the office receives an average of 1,200 CN citizenship applications per month. For a quicker processing time, Registration staff recommend citizenship applications be made shortly after a child is born. This will give staff time to process the application should any services be requested for the child in the future.

All applicants need to complete applications listing their direct lineal ancestors (parent, grandparent) back to a Dawes Roll enrollee. The application process times vary. Some applications may require more or updated information such as correct birth certificates and affidavits, and some applications may not be completed correctly.

“If the applicant’s parent is already registered, then we just need an application and birth certificate listing the Indian parent,” Associate Tribal Registrar Justin Godwin said. “If no one in the family has received CDIB (Certificate Degree Indian Blood) card or citizenship (card), then we will need the birth or death certificate beginning with the applicant back to the enrollee.”

The birth or death certificate must contain a state seal, state file number and be certified by the state registrar.
A Cherokee Nation Registration Office staff member assists a client. The office is in the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex in Tahlequah. It receives an average of 1,200 CN citizenship applications per month. LANI HANSEN/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee Nation citizen Crystal Jones visits the tribe’s Registration Office with her 7-year-old son Trenton, 4-year-old daughter Amiyah, 3-year-old daughter Sarina and 1-year-old son Nathan. COURTESY
A Cherokee Nation Registration Office staff member assists a client. The office is in the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex in Tahlequah. It receives an average of 1,200 CN citizenship applications per month. LANI HANSEN/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Phoenix taking names for elder/vet subscriptions

BY STAFF REPORTS
07/14/2018 10:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Phoenix is now taking names of elders and military veterans to provide free subscriptions of its monthly newspaper.

In November, Cherokee Nation Businesses donated $10,000 to the Cherokee Phoenix’s Elder/Veteran Fund. The fund provides free subscriptions of its monthly newspaper to elders 65 and older and military veterans who are Cherokee Nation citizens. Subscription rates are $10 for one year.

“The Elder/Veteran Fund was put into place to provide free subscriptions to our Cherokee elders and veterans,” Executive Editor Brandon Scott said. “Some of our elders and veterans are on a very limited budget, and other items have a priority over buying a newspaper subscription. The donations we receive have a real world impact on our elders and veterans, so every dollar donated to the Elder Fund is significant.”

Using the Elder/Veteran Fund, elders who are 65 and older as well as veterans can apply to receive a free one-year subscription by visiting, calling or writing the Cherokee Phoenix office and requesting a subscription.

The Cherokee Phoenix office is located in the Annex Building on the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex. The postal address is Cherokee Phoenix, P.O. Box 948, Tahlequah, OK 74465. To call about the fund, call 918-207-4975 or 918-453-5269 or email justin-smith@cherokee.org or joy-rollice@cherokee.org.
http://cherokeepublichealth.org/

Cherokee Nation gives $90K to domestic violence shelters

BY STAFF REPORTS
07/13/2018 03:30 PM
TAHLEQUAH – According to a Cherokee Nation press release, the tribe donated a total of $90,000 to six Oklahoma-based domestic violence shelters on July 10.

Each shelter received $15,000. Those shelters are Women in Safe Homes Inc., of Muskogee; Safenet Services, of Claremore; Help-In-Crisis, of Tahlequah; Family Crisis Counseling Center, of Bartlesville; Domestic Violence Intervention Services, of Tulsa; and Community Crisis Center Inc., of Miami.

“Together, these entities are helping hundreds of domestic violence victims across northeast Oklahoma escape the atmosphere of physical, verbal and emotional abuse,” Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. said. “All six of these services are doing some fantastic work with the help of their employees and volunteers. There should be no doubt they are committed to breaking the cycle of domestic violence, which is, unfortunately, plaguing Indian Country. I’m proud to say the Cherokee Nation is supportive of their mission.”

Safenet Services operates a 35-bed center for women and children who are victims of domestic violence. Among the key services offered by Safenet is an intervention program for those accused of domestic violence.

The release states that the CN’s donation is helping Safenet recruit volunteers and organize approximately 300 who already work with the entity throughout the year.

Candidates see rigorous training before becoming marshals

BY LANI HANSEN
Intern
07/13/2018 08:30 AM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation Marshal Services is a tribal law enforcement agency that has 33 deputy marshals who cover the Cherokee Nation’s jurisdiction, which covers all or part of 14 counties in northeast Oklahoma.

The CNMS received about 40 applications for deputy marshal this past year and has an average of about 30 to 60 applications in a hiring cycle.

“They go through physicals, mental health (testing) and…a psychological evaluation,” Marshal Shannon Buhl said. “They will do their weapons qualification, get sprayed with OC (oleoresin capsicum or pepper) spray and get Taser-certified.”

Deputy marshals can only work “in house” and not on the street until they receive an academy date. The academy, known as FLETC, is the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center. It is in Artesian, New Mexico, and is four months long.

Also to become a deputy marshal, one must study a policy manual that is about 600 pages long and be tested on it.
Deputy Marshal Buddy Clinton adjusts his gear as he prepares to go out on patrol. LANI HANSEN/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee Nation Marshal Service vehicles are all marked with a seven-star logo to represent the tribe’s seven clans and the words “Marshal Service” on the driver and passenger doors. LANI HANSEN/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Deputy Marshal Buddy Clinton begins his patrolling duties. Marshals work in shifts but are on patrol 24 hours a day, seven days a week. LANI HANSEN/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Deputy Marshal Buddy Clinton adjusts his gear as he prepares to go out on patrol. LANI HANSEN/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
https://www.facebook.com/CASA-of-Cherokee-Country-184365501631027/

Election Commission urges voter registration to eligible citizens

BY STAFF REPORTS
06/21/2018 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation’s Election Commission wants to ensure that eligible CN citizens register to vote in the tribe’s 2019 general election, which is set for June 1.

According to an EC press release, CN citizens who are at least 18 years old, or will be 18 on the day of the general election, must register to vote by midnight CST on March 29.

The release also states that people who have never registered to vote or who aren’t registered in the districts of their respective residences, as well as people who are registered but need to change their registration information, may register by completing and submitting CN voter registration applications on or before the voter registration deadline.

According to the release, voters with new 911 addresses will also need to complete voter registration applications, updating their address information on or before March 29.

“Now is the time to check and make sure you are registered to vote. Citizens are encouraged to check with the Election Commission office and to verify the information is correct,” Elections Director Connie Parnell said. “With Cherokee Nation Holiday fast approaching the Election Commission will be attending the holiday celebration. The Election Commission will provide voter registration stations for the visitors to check on their registrations.”

Cherokee Nation Management & Consulting supporting U.S. military forces

BY STAFF REPORTS
06/19/2018 08:45 AM
TULSA – Cherokee Nation Management & Consulting, a subsidiary of Cherokee Nation Businesses, has secured two indefinite-delivery contracts with the U.S. Army.

“We are pleased to continue growing our relationship with the Department of Defense and the U.S. Army,” Steven Bilby, CNB’s diversified businesses president, said. “It is a great honor and privilege to serve the brave men and women of the U.S. Armed Forces who serve our country so bravely.”

Through the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the tribally owned company will provide the U.S. Army with professional support to ensure sustainable and ready operational services and enhance the ability of the U.S. military forces to fight and meet the demands of the national military strategy.

CNMC will provide a skilled team of analysts and specialists to support the OASA IEE and its Energy and Sustainability Directorates in focus areas such as environment, safety and occupational health, strategic integration, installations, housing, and partnerships.

“We are proud to have these opportunities,” Scott Edwards, CNMC operations general manager, said. “As a company, we are dedicated to providing first-class service, and we’re looking forward to deploying the expertise and skills of our team to support the vital mission of the U.S. military.”

CN gives $138K to local law enforcement agencies

BY STAFF REPORTS
06/18/2018 04:00 PM
HULBERT – Cherokee Nation officials recently distributed $138,400 to 27 law enforcement agencies that patrol within the tribe’s jurisdictional area.

CN officials recently gave $15,000 and $10,000 to the Hulbert and Okay police departments, respectively.

According to a CN press release, the Hulbert funds were provided through the Tribal Council’s annual law enforcement funds. Tribal Councilors Joe Byrd, Rex Jordan and David Walkingstick each dedicated a portion of their allocated funds.

“This donation means a great deal to me and my department,” Hulbert Police Chief Casey Rowe said. “Our budget is so short and it’s such a small department that having this extra $15,000 helps us make it through the year. I don’t think our department could make it without it. It’s a great thing.”

Okay Mayor Bradley Mathews said the $10,000 donation helps fund a contract with the Wagoner County Sheriff’s Office for law enforcement service in the community.

United Keetoowah Band to begin Elder Home Project

BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Former Reporter
06/15/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The United Keetoowah Band is finalizing building plans and will soon move forward with its Elder Home Project, a pilot program to construct small, energy efficient homes for low-income elders ages 55 and older.

“There was a need for housing for some of our elders who lived in substandard housing conditions, but we didn’t necessarily want to put them in a big two-bedroom, three-bedroom house because they really can’t afford to live in a house that big,” Charles Deason, UKB Housing Department development manager, said. “We got to researching different housing options and it was kind of born from there.”

Deason said the project is expected to begin within “60 to 90 days” using approved contractors via a bidding process. He described the homes as “cottages” on permanent foundations ranging from 500 to 1,000 square feet.

“It will have insurance ratings, and it will be built to the national building codes, and it will be a standard home. They’ll be fully equipped when we give you the keys, minus the furniture. It will have all the appliances and all the amenities of a regular home. It’ll just be a small home. We’re looking to do two to three this year and next year, depending on the amount of applications and the participation that we have. We hope to maybe increase that.”

The homes are intended for one to two occupants.

Culture

Cherokee artists win at Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/10/2018 08:30 AM
INDIANAPOLIS – At the 26th annual Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival held June 23-24, Native American artists, including Cherokees, were awarded nearly $16,000 in cash prizes, as well as ribbons for art works they entered into competition.

Cherokee artist Bryan Waytula, of Sand Springs, Oklahoma, received first place in the Painting Category and the “Best of Class” award for his painting titled “We Stand As One.” He also received first place for his drawing titled “A Cherokee Treasure,” which is a colored pencil piece with a piece of mat weaving placed at the bottom of the artwork.

Waytula said he used remnants from one of his mom’s traditional river cane baskets.

His mother, Vivian Garner Cottrell, and his grandmother, Betty Scraper Garner, are both Cherokee National Treasures, which means they have been honored by the Cherokee Nation for their basketwork and for sharing their knowledge of basket making with others.

“I’m trying to follow big footprints left my grandmother and mother, both treasures. Those two are rock stars to me,” Waytula said.

He said it was his first time visiting the Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival and was “impressed” with the facility, the artwork and the staff.

“I was very impressed with how amazing the staff was towards all the extremely-talented artists I had the pleasure of meeting and seeing their amazing work,” he said. “My dad, who is now retired, came along and helped me drive so it was a fun bonding trip too.”

Cherokee basket artist and Cherokee National Treasure Mike Dart, of Stilwell, Oklahoma, also won first place and "Best of Class" for his basket titled “Four Winds.” And he won a first place ribbon in the Non-Native Materials Category, a third-place ribbon in the Traditional Basketry Category and second place in the Contemporary Basketry Category.

“Eiteljorg Indian Market is a top of the line show with some of the ‘Best of the Best’ artists from across the nation and Canada. Seeing my name among the list of division winners was an honor. I’m proud and honored to be able to represent the Cherokee Nation in these art markets,” Dart said.

Also, Cherokee artist Lisa Rutherford won third place in the Contemporary Pottery Category and third place in the Cultural Items Category.

The Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art in Indianapolis hosted more than 100 artists from 60 Native American tribes who showed their jewelry, pottery, baskets, beadwork, carvings, paintings and cultural items. The two-day market and festival drew thousands of visitors who met the artists, purchased their art and enjoyed music, food and performances on the museum’s grounds.

“The Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival creates opportunities for collectors and artists to connect and it builds support for today’s Native American artists,” Eiteljorg President and CEO John Vanausdall said. “The beautiful art works the artists have created make a powerful impact on our market goers and have contributed to the success of the Indian Market and Festival during its 26 years.”

Images of the winning artworks in 11 categories are on the Eiteljorg Museum’s Facebook page, and a complete list of award recipients in all categories and prize sponsors is at www.eiteljorg.org/explore/festivals-and-events/indian-market-festival.

Education

Cherokee Nation College Resources serves college, concurrent students
BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
07/11/2018 08:30 AM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation’s College Resources continues to provide scholarships to concurrent, undergraduate and graduate students to help them continue their educational endeavors.

College Resources serves 147 high schools in the jurisdiction and surrounding counties. In the 2017-18 school yea, 4,325 undergraduate and graduates students and 417 concurrent students received financial aid.

“We’re primarily focused toward high school juniors and seniors and then the current students that we have trying to keep them in school and trying to make sure they meet the deadlines,” Jennifer Pigeon, CN Education Services’ fiscal management and administration manager, said.

College Resources provides concurrent enrollment scholarships, high school valedictorian and salutatorian scholarships, undergraduate scholarships, graduate scholarships and financial assistance for directed studies.

Concurrent students who are high school juniors receive financial aid for tuition, books and fees for up to six hours of general education courses. Seniors only receive financial aid for books and fees due to a state waiver that pays for tuition.

Senior valedictorians and salutatorians receive a one-time scholarship upon graduating high school. Valedictorians receive up to $1,000 and salutatorians receive up to $750.

Undergraduate and graduate students receive up to $2,000 per semester.

“Once they’re accepted, undergrads are required to maintain a 2.0, concurrent a 2.5, and our graduates just need to remain in good standing with the college that they’re in,” Pigeon said.

She said to renew their scholarships students must turn in their grades and community service hours. One hour of community service is required for every $100 received.

Pigeon said students taking part in directed studies are limited to a University of Oklahoma rate of an equivalent degree meaning. For example, if a student is studying to become a doctor, dentist, or lawyer and do not choose to attend OU, College Resources will pay up to whatever OU’s rate would charge by paying for the tuition, books, fees, any required equipment and a housing stipend.

CN citizens and citizens of federally recognized tribes are eligible to receive College Resources financial aid. However, federally recognized tribal citizens besides CN citizens are only awarded if they qualify for the federal Pell grant known as the Free Application for Federal Student Aid or FAFSA. The award varies based on the number of applicants.

College Resources also provides a computer lab at the W.W. Keeler Complex equipped with six computer stations, printers and scanners to help students with the application process, and College Resources staff also participate in college and career fairs such the tribe’s College and Career Night to promote scholarship opportunities to students.

Information, applications and deadlines for the 2019-20 school year can be found at www.cherokee.org/Services/Education/College-Resources or by calling 1-800-256-0671, ext. 5465 or emailing collegeresources@cherokee.org.

Council

Tribal Council approves $31M Indian Housing Plan
BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
07/12/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – At the July 9 Tribal Council meeting, legislators unanimously authorized the submission of the fiscal year 2019 Indian Housing Plan, estimated at more than $31 million, to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

The FY2019 funds will be used for housing assistance such as $5.6 million for housing rehabilitation, nearly $4.5 million for the Rental Assistance Program and $3.4 million for the Mortgage Assistance Program.

Legislators also unanimously adopted revisions to the FY2018 IHP because the Cherokee Nation’s $31.8 million Indian Housing Block Grant allocation was higher than estimates provided. The CN’s submitted FY2018 IHP, as required by the Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act, had an original estimate of nearly $29 million.

“The actual appropriations are based on what Congress approves in the federal budget. For this year it was $655 million for NAHASDA and our part was the $31,856,007,” Housing Authority of the Cherokee Nation Executive Director Gary Cooper said. “The current two appropriations being considered, one in the House, the other in the Senate, both include amounts equal to 2018. Assuming that Congress does pass a budget or omnibus or other type of appropriations bill for next year at the same (amount), we should receive more than the estimate.”

Legislators also unanimously authorized the submission of a tribal soil climate analysis network, also known as TSCAN or a weather station. The weather station will be placed on tribal property near the buffalo ranch in Delaware County.

The resolution said the CN recognizes the importance of addressing food, agriculture and natural resource needs within the CN boundaries through the utilization of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resource Conservation Services, Department of Interior and Bureau of Indian Affairs.

“This is an NCRS project. It will give us more soil climate data, soil moisture information. It will be really helpful for researches and people who are really involved in agriculture. So it will be a good thing,” CN Natural Resources Sara Hill said in a June 11 Resource Committee meeting.

In other business, legislators:

• Authorized a grant application for an economic development feasibility study for FY2019 on creating a blackberry processing and marketing program utilizing organic blackberry growers who are CN citizens,

• Amending the comprehensive FY2018 capital budget with an increase of $8 million for a total budget authority of $260.2 million, and

• Amended the comprehensive FY2018 operating budget with an increase of $29.7 million for a total budget authority of $724.7 million. The changes reflecting the increase include increases in the General Fund budget of $312,725; the DOI-Self Governance budget of $388,958; the Indian Health Service Self-Governance Health budget of $24.6 million; and the IHS-Self Governance TEH budget of $4.5 million.

Health

Fallin signs emergency rules, infuriates marijuana advocates
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
07/13/2018 12:45 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin on July 11 signed into place strict emergency rules for medical marijuana that pot advocates say are intentionally aimed at delaying the voter-approved use of medicinal cannabis.

The term-limited Republican governor signed the rules just one day after her appointees on the state’s Board of Health adopted them at an emergency meeting after last-minute changes to ban the sale of smokable marijuana and require a pharmacist at every pot dispensary.

Those late additions to the rules infuriated longtime medical marijuana advocates who helped get the measure on the ballot in June, when nearly 57 percent of Oklahoma voters approved it. Her quick signature also came just as medical pot advocates were rallying supporters to urge her to reject them.

“People are completely angry. They voted for (State Question) 788 and now you have the health department and our governor pull these shenanigans?” said Isaac Caviness, president of Green the Vote, a marijuana advocacy group that pushed for the passage of the state question. “It’s a slap in the face to all activists. It’s a slap in the face to all Oklahomans who voted on 788.”

Groups that opposed legalizing medical marijuana – including ones that represent doctors, pharmacists, hospitals and chambers of commerce – earlier this week called for new restrictions on the industry, including a ban on the sale of smokable pot and the pharmacist restriction. The board approved the two provisions against the advice of the health department’s general counsel, who said the rules likely were beyond the agency’s legal authority. Marijuana advocates say they’re considering legal action against the board.

In a statement on July 11, Fallin said she thinks the rules were the best way to quickly set up a regulatory framework for medical marijuana.

“I know some citizens are not pleased with these actions,” Fallin said. “But I encourage everyone to approach this effort in a constructive fashion in order to honor the will of the citizens of Oklahoma who want a balanced and responsible medical marijuana law.”

Opinion

OPINION: Expanded laws allow CN to better enforce VAWA
BY BILL JOHN BAKER
Principal Chief
07/05/2018 12:00 PM
The Cherokee Nation remains committed to protecting our women and children from violence. As principal chief, I reinforced that dedication by creating the ONE FIRE program for survivors of domestic violence, and recently, the Tribal Council passed laws that strengthen our ability to protect Native women and children within our own jurisdiction.

The amended titles 21 and 22 of the Cherokee Code Annotated allow the tribe to better enforce the Violence Against Women Act tribal-jurisdiction provisions aimed at preventing domestic abuse and violence against women and children on tribal reservations.

These amendments authorize the CN to prosecute non-Indians for domestic violence, dating violence or violations of protective orders within our jurisdiction. The CN has the authority to hold offenders accountable for their crimes against women and children regardless of the perpetrator’s race. This law will apply to a spouse or partner of a CN citizen or other tribal citizen with ties to our jurisdiction.

Additionally, the Tribal Council also modified Title 12 of the Cherokee Code Annotated, which gives the CN’s District Court the expanded ability to issue and enforce protective orders for acts of domestic violence occurring within the CN. The amendments enable CN courts and CN marshals to combat domestic abuse more effectively.

Native American women suffer from violent crime at some of the highest rates in the United States. With non-Indians constituting a significant percent of the overall population living on tribal lands, it is imperative that we take this action to close the jurisdictional gap in the CN. This will have a significant impact on the health and wellbeing of women and children within the CN’s 14 counties.

I want to commend the CN attorney general’s office for working on this new law for more than two years, and the Tribal Council for taking this major step in flexing the CN’s sovereign muscle to bring justice to Native American victims.

We will continue to offer programs and services that curb the rate of domestic abuse. Our people deserve to live healthy and secure lives within the CN. We have always looked at how our decisions will impact the next seven generations, and providing a safe future for our children and grandchildren is an important part of securing that future.

People

3 Cherokee youths win golf tournaments
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/10/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Three local Cherokee youths competed in the U.S. Kids Golf – Tulsa Spring Tour held between March and June that consisted of seven tournaments.

Kylie Fisher, Edwin Wacoche and Chase Jones also competed in the season-ending Tour Championship at the Cherokee Hills Golf Course at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Tulsa on June 10. They received points based on how they finished in each tournament with each player with the most points winning the division.

Fisher, of Tahlequah, competed in the Girls 7-Under Division and won all seven tournaments played at Tulsa-area golf courses, plus the championship on June 10 with a score of 36 for nine holes. Wacoche, of Tahlequah, won the Boys 6-under Division and Jones, of Park Hill, won the Boys 10 Division.

Fisher also recently won the U.S. Kids Golf Texas State Invitational for girl’s 7-under held June 18-19, by shooting 35 and 35 for a score of 70. The competitors in the tournament played 9 holes each day at the Brookhaven Country Club in Farmers Branch, Texas.

“We were surprised she won it. She shot her best score to date in that tournament,” her mother Shauna Fisher, said.
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